The First Series About The Pandemic

The Honeyzoomers is the first series about the pandemic shot during the pandemic - made in the classic sitcom style, it is a show that will take you back to the present! 

A writer from Manhattan.  An actor from Brooklyn.  Another actor from the Bronx.  A composer from New Jersey.  All working remotely and all in the service of creating the first series shot about the Coronavirus pandemic during the pandemic.  That’s what we wanted to do.  To be a testament to this point in history that we’re all living through.  And to do it in the style of the old fashioned sitcoms we love:  The Odd Couple, All in the Family, and, of course, The Honeymooners

 

The language of this crisis has given us a plethora of new terms that we weren’t very familiar with before this but that have now become a permanent part of our lives and our lexicon.  Social Distancing, Bending The Curve and Zooming were not activities many of us had engaged in before March of 2020 and now they’re things we do every day.  The fusion of the familiar tropes of situation comedy and the insanity of the new normal combine in The Honeyzoomers to make an unprecedented set of circumstances feel approachable, manageable, and hysterical! 

 

Deb and Ant Bizzaro are a sister and brother, a teacher and a former bus driver, who are “temporarily” living together in Ant’s apartment in Greenwich Village because of Deb’s separation from her philandering husband.  With nowhere to go she moved in with her older sibling Ant, who lived alone, never married.  She planned on moving out after getting herself on her feet.  Then the pandemic struck.  Stay at home orders were issued in New York City and throughout much of the country.  Deb and Ant were stuck together indefinitely.   Opposite personalities, their time together in quarantine is spent bickering, dealing with Ant’s severe health anxieties, Debbie’s wounded ego from her break-up and reconnecting over personal and familial issues.  

 

The Honeyzoomers is comfortably old school  and yet wholly unique.  The show is groundbreaking in its homespun approach.  Through distant creativity the series crafts an illusion of closeness on screen between actors and creators who are all, by necessity, in separate locations.  It is a novel way to create, but the result is an engaging, poignant, real and funny show, which is also a record of how we lived through and laughed through one of the most challenging chapters in American history.